Travel: Attractions of Eastern Canada

Attractions of Eastern Canada

Canada’s Eastern-most tourist destinations are places you can only reach by air or water. Newfoundland was settled by the Viking explorer, Leif Ericsson, in 1000 A.D.

If you fly to Newfoundland, you can have an amazing vacation without ever leaving the island. If you’re driving, you can take the 6 to 7 hour ferry trip.

Walk down the what may be the oldest street in North America - Water Street, in St. John's, Newfoundland.

You can enjoy The Signal Hill Tattoo, where cannon and musket fire gives way to the stirring tunes of the Fife and Drum Band in a thrilling recreation of British garrison life in the harsh conditions of the Newfoundland Station in the mid 1800's.

It will take you another ferry, to reach Prince Edward Island – Canada’s smallest province. Visit the colonial seaport city of Charlottetown. And make sure to stop in Cavendish, to visit Green Gables, the farmhouse immortalized in the book Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery.

Nova Scotia is an amazing place to explore Canada’s history – and to see some its most beautiful sights.

Look out on the city of Halifax and its historic waterfront from the ramparts of the Halifax Citadel, a star-shaped fortress.

Visit Pier 21 National Historic Site, where over 1 million immigrants took their first steps onto Canadian soil. This original immigration shed operated from 1928-1971.

Half an hour south of Halifax is Peggy's Cove and its famous lighthouse, perched atop spectacular granite boulders worn smooth by the pounding waves.

See the amazing Reversing Falls where the highest tides in the world do something that doesn’t happen anywhere else – they push the St. John River backwards until the river runs in reverse – upstream.

Drive to the bottom of world-famous Magnetic Hill, New Brunswick, take your foot off the brake and sit in amazement as your car rolls up the hill.

See the only walled city in North America – the old quarter of Québec City.

See the changing of the guard at the Québec Citadel, a fort so imposing, that it has been called "the Gibraltar of America".

In Montreal, the second largest French-speaking city in the world, you can enjoy the nightlife, restaurants and visit fabulous ethnic neighbourhoods including "Little Italy", "Chinatown" and the Latin Quarter.

In Gatineau, Quebec, on the shore of the Ottawa River, across from Parliament the Parliament Buildings, visit the spectacular Museum of Civilization.

During a visit to the nation’s capital in Ottawa things you must-see include the famous RCMP Musical Ride.

Go to Parliament Hill in Ottawa. The Centennial Flame in front of the main building was lit in 1966 to commemorate the centenary of the Canadian Confederation.

See some of Canada and the World’s most famous artwork on display at the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa.

CNM