Jobs: How to Find a Job in Canada - Common Problems and Effective Solutions

by Consuelo Solar

How to Find a Job in CanadaWith a work permit in hand and the goal of building a happier and safer life in a new country, many immigrants arrive in Canada hoping to secure their families’ future by finding a good job, ideally a better one than what they had back home.

Some of them even dream of pursuing an entirely different career, yet they often don’t know a thing about the Canadian job market and they are clueless about where to find information. Soon their goals become hard to attain and some of them are forced to seek survival jobs, where they stay indefinitely, waiting for their lucky break.

Luck, however, has only a small part in finding work opportunities in such a highly competitive and selective market. The reality is that finding employment is a job in itself – a full time job. This is the main idea behind How to Find a job in Canada: Common Problems and Efective Solutions, a comprehensive handbook for newcomers searching for work in Canada. It provides well-researched and organized information about the Canadian job market and the support system for skilled immigrants, true experiences and success stories, and a complete analysis of pretty much any issue a newcomer might face when attempting to find work in their new home.

The book covers a broad selection of subjects specific to immigrant job seekers’ concerns such as preparing before the trip, transitional jobs, employment services and provincial labour market trends. It also includes traditional job guide topics, like cover letters, résumé writing, interviewing and network-building, although they are reviewed from a newcomer’s perspective.

Both authors have vast experience in the subject. Efim Cheinis is a Russian Ph.D. scientist who went through the ordeal of looking for employment in Canada when he immigrated in 1995. Over the years, he has published more than two hundred articles in the press that deal with immigrant employment concerns. Dale Sproule, publisher of Canadian Newcomer Magazine specializes in writing clearly about sources to help newcomers adapt to Canadian society.

Their objective is to take the reader on a tour of the Canadian job market to find answers for speeding up their job hunting process. The result is a problemand- solution structure that integrates the authors’ insights in a resourceful way.

Written in simple and direct language, one of the main qualities of this book is that it is accessible for newcomers who lack language skills or come from totally different cultures. Other strengths include real-life stories from immigrants featured throughout its fourteen chapters, which will certainly help the reader feel more familiar with this unknown territory.

Ideally this book should be in the packing list along with the warm clothes and the English and French dictionaries, at least three months before taking that plane to Canada. As the first chapter observes "although it’s safe to predict that the job-search process will take a long time, one can make that time shorter by planning" and reading this manual is a great first step in that plan.

Nevertheless, the book is a handy reference tool during the whole process and it might be a good idea to keep it within reach even if one has already found a job, since it also has an entire section dedicated to things to consider once hired, such as understanding the employer’s expectations, adapting to the workplace culture and etiquette and becoming familiarized with one’s rights as an employee.

According to the authors "the most valuable personality trait in Canada is a positive attitude" and they advise the reader to stay optimistic and keep an open mind. This guide is a reassuring instrument to stay on the right track throughout the whole process, even if those goals seem unattainable at first.

CNM